This is a wonderful blog always, but I just HAD to share this post!

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About sweatyknitter

Fiber art devotee, author, and amateur artisan bread baker.
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12 Responses to

  1. When my daughter was about 13, she said she would clean the bathroom if I would vacuum. She hated vacuuming! Worked for us. 🙂

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  2. Ha, I hate cleaning! I’ve organized my boys into doing most of it for me. We all stop and do chores, which is why their bathroom is cleaner than mine 🙂

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  3. I am in my 50s and, like you, am busy! I am having a wonderful time and feel this is the best time of my life so far! Good luck with the organizing … that’s never been my strong suit! 🙂

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  4. I am in my 50s and, like you, am busy! I am having a wonderful time and feel this is the best time of my life so far! Good luck with the organizing … that’s never been my strong suit! 🙂

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  5. I’m barely “competent” in housework stuff (cleaning, vacuuming, etc.). Actually, I might be a bit below the competent bar … 🙂

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  6. When I was married to my second husband I stopped enjoying cooking because he had so many demands (and criticisms) – oh, let me not forget his “suggestions” (from a man who couldn’t/wouldn’t boil water!). I divorced him in short order, of course, but didn’t really re-discover until the last couple of years. And now I am also enjoying teaching the grandchildren how to make their favorite things, too!

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  7. I have that issue with my mother too, although she takes an entirely different view of her talent! Cooking and food need to be appreciated but so do the chef. I’m glad Thor appreciates the efforts. 🙂

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  8. ethgran says:

    I looked at the article again and noticed the word “competent” – a better word for my cooking.;o}

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  9. ethgran says:

    My mother was a wonderful cook but I resisted to be taught so she was sneaky about teaching me – having me stir the gravy as she prepared the stuff to go into the meat drippings (most of the time it was just flour stirred into cold water then salted if needed). I am now the best gravy maker I know. ;o} However my enthusiasm about cooking never materialized but I fed my family well. In retirement, I told my husband that I am retiring from cooking so now we prepare what we want separately. I am a super taster and he is a non-taster so what we like to eat are light years apart. Occasionally I will fix something he likes and he will join me but only after putting every condiment in the cupboard on it. Juck. I probably became a “good” cook in good 30’s – my family seemed to have no problems with my cooking except for the one son who didn’t like food touching so my fabulous pork stew didn’t do it for him. ;o\

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  10. I really hope that it doesn’t take me ’till my 50’s to become an interesting person, or a good cook. I’m busy experiencing life right now! Granted, by my 50’s, with the kids out of the house, perhaps I’d be able to organize everything and make a masterpiece out of all this living.

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  11. My mother was an awful cook, but as I could read well 🙂 I started teaching myself to cook when I was about 11 or so. I became a skilled cook – though with lots of trials and errors. But marriage to my second husband quashed it: he not only demanded regular “theme” meals (from specific countries), but criticized everything I made (though I never saw him boil water). After I divorced him, I refused to cook for years (unless you count microwaving as cooking). Only the last couple of years have I returned to cooking, baking, canning, etc. – and am really enjoying it. No one criticizes me; in fact, everytime I try something new Thor looks a bit amazed … but then he looks that way at our “stand bys” too. 🙂

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  12. Well it could just be the natural result of experience and maturity! But you need to have been a good cook to start with, if you were a bad cook in your 20s and 30s then it’s rarely going to change just because someone hits 50. 🙂

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