Addendum to Part 2, Anatomy of a Knitting Pattern

As Linda Marveng noted, I omitted Japanese sizing for knitting needles and crochet hooks in Anatomy of a Pattern, Part 2.  OOPS!  Mea culpa.  Thank you, Linda!

Today I revised my Excel document containing needle and hook comparisons and prepared a one-page PDF which I attach for FYI: SweatyKnitter’s Needle/Hook Comparison Chart.  Hopefully this will aid hapy  knitting in all languages!

shawl1As an aside, I just finished an asymmetrical silk shawl (Artfibers‘ Sylph, 76% silk, 19% superkid mohair and 5% wool).  I started out with a wingspan-derived pattern but abandoned the pattern after the first day or so.  This grew into something much different Shawl3(and far more dramatic).  My friend MaryLou modeled it for me while it was in progress and, especially, while I decided how shawl2to end the shawl.  That’s a crochet hook holding it closed at her shoulder. 🙂  After some experimentation, I ended it with that shell-like curl you can see in this closeup to the left.  That design element, by the way, was Thor’s suggestion!

Sylph is amazing.  Because of its large percentage of silk, it has a shine that’s eye-catching.  (Artfibers dyes Sylph in an array of colors.)   As silk, mohair and wool all pick up color differently, the yarn fairly shimmers.

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About sweatyknitter

Fiber art devotee, author, and amateur artisan bread baker.
This entry was posted in Crocheting, Dyeing, Fibers, Knitting. Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Addendum to Part 2, Anatomy of a Knitting Pattern

  1. Zylo says:

    Hi, I’m back again. I’m trying to round up your anatomy posts, but can’t seem to locate them. It’s easy to find part 2 and 6, but not the rest. Do you have anywhere that you’ve put them all together?

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  2. Well, I wrote down what I think I did but I would have to knit again to see if it comes out the same way. :). No hooks were used in this project.

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  3. Zylo says:

    I absolutely love that shawl! I wish there was a pattern for something like that. Did you use needles or a hook for the end loop shell?

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  4. Thank you … it didn’t come together right away … lots of stops and starts! 🙂

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  5. salpal1 says:

    beautiful shawl. You have quite an eye for design.

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  6. I love that it is on one page.

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  7. Yes, definitely uncommon. It sort of took on a life of its own. 🙂

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  8. Wow, that is a dramatic shawl! What an unusual shape!

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  9. I hope the chart is useful! The shawl turned out better than I had originally thought. Twice I almost fragged it, but Thor asked me not too. I think he saw something in it before I did, 🙂

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  10. Curls & Q says:

    Q- great chart! The shawl is stunning!

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  11. I am always grateful when someone points out a not insignificant oversight! Yes, that shell curl turned out interesting. I haven’t secured the ends as I keep toying with the idea of using a Hardangersom stitch in the middle. Am not sure anyone but needle workers and Norwegians would recognize it though. 🙂 I wore that wrap yesterday – a couple of boutique owners asked me where I bought it.

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  12. I am glad you find the chart useful. I wrestled with it quite a bit to get it to fit neatly on one page, but thankfully Thor’s an expert with the software I was using so he fixed it. 🙂

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  13. Thanks for reading the post. I am glad you liked it!

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  14. I am glad to be of help, and thank you for mentioning me! Your pdf is ever so useful, and I love your shawl design! The shell like curl ending is a magnificent idea on such a stylish shawl!

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  15. I LOVE your ( well mine now and Thank you very much!) hook conversion chart. It is wonderful.
    Succinct yet nothing is omitted. My favorite hook is the 13 or 2.25 mm. It makes the very best Amigurumi. Including the Japanese info is great especially since they are responsible for Ami’s in the first place. I can see a “Sweaty knitter” craft book in your future.! 🙂

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  16. Tina says:

    Great post!

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