A Few Pictures of FOs

 

After Thor’s Valentine Day sweater was blocked and dried, he graciously agreed to model it for blog post pictures.

Larry_Sw2First Picture:  Raglan sleeves work well on Thor.  This picture shows how the faux (twist) cables I worked in between the decrease stitches (separated by a purl stitch) morphed beautifully into the cables on the neckline.

Larry_Sw1Second Picture:  Thor wanted a kangaroo pocket.  (He doesn’t like to wear gloves unless it’s snowing.)  You can make out the row where I joined a kangaroo pocket back to the body.

Larry_Sw3Third Picture.  This shows not just the cabled cuff but cable that goes up each side of the kangaroo pocket.

It is important to be sure and use a good, well-spun wool when making a kangaroo pocket.  Otherwise, you risk both the pocket pulling the sweater out of shape or stretching out and becoming more of a hanging pouch than a neat, kangaroo pocket.

Thor is quite happy with this sweater!

I’ve also been baking breads … here are some pictures of this week’s efforts.

First is a picture of my first attempt at making a couronne (crown).  I used Peter Reinhart’s recipe for Pain de Campagne (“a type of sourdough bread used throughout France for many types of breads sold under various local names”).  It was leavened with a pâte fermentée and proofed in a brotform.

breadcouronneHere is a picture of the two loaves I just took out of the oven.  They’re both Jewish (aka deli) ryes.  The recipe is based on George Greenstein’s Secrets of a Jewish Baker: Authentic Jewish Rye and Other Breads.  I prefer dark rye flours (must be my Norwegian childhood) so instead of using the standard white rye flour, I used dark rye flour in the 750g starter.  (White rye flour is to dark rye flour what white flour is to whole wheat flour).

Bread_RyeWithout exception, every person who has told me they don’t like rye breads loves the ryes I make that don’t have caraway seeds.  I make many types of rye breads, but I only use caraway seeds in the Jewish/deli ryes (which is the traditional way).

If you like rye breads, I urge you to skip trying to sour a dry-yeast leavened rye bread with dried onions, pickle juice or artificial flavors.  Experiment with sourdoughs!  Nothing beats the complex flavors of a “real” sourdough (rye or otherwise)!

 

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About sweatyknitter

Fiber art devotee, author, and amateur artisan bread baker.
This entry was posted in Breads, Cooking, Knitting, Miscellany. Bookmark the permalink.

30 Responses to A Few Pictures of FOs

  1. I think so too! Thor loves it.😄

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    Liked by 1 person

  2. writeknit says:

    The sweater turned out great – looks really warm and a perfect fit.

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  3. I am very pleased with how it turned out. I’m in the process of designing and knitting a hood (cotton lined) that will button into the inside of the sweater neckband. I knit about 4 inches when I realized I forgot to knit in the button holes! Ah well, I’ll put them in after the fact as it were. 🙂

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  4. Rebecca says:

    Such a great looking sweater, very hearty and rugged, but the details are so very knitterly. Something for the knitter and the wearer!

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  5. Pingback: “It’s Too Short!” | The Sweaty Knitter, Weaver and Devotee of Other Fiber Arts

  6. Thank you. The icing on the proverbial cake, of course, is that Thor loves it! I no longer knit sweaters for my daughter … One too many “that’s not what I had in mind” after I designed and knit exactly to her specifications! 😦

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  7. The jumper looks really elegant and it’s definitely a timeless classic! Gorgeous! The fit is professional, so is all the detail and the finish. It shows how carefully you designed and crafted it!

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  8. Thanks! Thor loves wearing it. 🙂 >

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  9. Thank you … he loves it … of course he also loves the one that pills madly but at least has promised not to wear that one outside! 🙂 And the breads were indeed quite delicious! >

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I think those additions are attempts to make the flavor appear more complex and imitate a heartier bread. Having made bread both ways, I VASTLY prefer the sourdough version … my rye breads have only flour, water, levain (sourdough) and salt … and the flavors are amazing.

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    Liked by 1 person

  11. If you’re not partial to caraway, I’d suggest staying away from the Jewish/deli ryes. I agree with you … the Germans can really bake a rye bread. So could my grandmother. 🙂 >

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  12. That rye makes great sandwich bread! I like how the cables turned out too! Just enough to give a little pizzazz to a simple sweater. 🙂

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  13. Libby says:

    I love the cable touches to the sweater, it looks great.

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  14. salpal1 says:

    The bread looks delicious, the sweater is a work of art – seemingly so simple, yet filled with well executed details. And the fit – oh my! Great job! No wonder he loves it. 🙂

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  15. djdfr says:

    I remember a rye bread recipe that had all kinds of things in it, like onion and cocoa, maybe there was molasses? It was supposed to be a Russian peasant bread. I was thinking they wouldn’t have these exotic ingredients, what is trying to be imitated?

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  16. kiwiyarns says:

    A fabulous job of the sweater! I do love how the cables blend with the neckline detail! I never liked rye bread, until I had some properly baked in Germany. It was dark rye. Very delicious! Yours looks very edible. I can just taste it with a generous layer of butter!

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  17. bamcrafts979 says:

    Thor’s sweater looks amazing! I love all the little cables, they really show how important attention to detail can be and how it really pays off. Also I’m really hungry now. I blame your pictures!

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  18. What I didn’t mention in this post is that I misread my scribbled design notes and the sleeves were too short! 😦 So I cut off the sleeves about an inch below where the yoke shaping begins, picked up the stitches on the bottom part of the sleeve, knit several more rows, then joined back on. The join is invisible. 🙂

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  19. fabrickated says:

    That is a beautiful sweater. It fits so well, and your advice on the kangaroo pocket makes a lot of sense. In fact it is so nicely done I didn’t even notice it.

    We have tried rye with 100% rye and no sourdough starter. It was very tasty – astringent and sweet. Normally we use 40% rye with white and sourdough. Great with home made salt beef.

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  20. Susan says:

    Hmm, you trying to make me buy ANOTHER book ? hahaha But Lepard’s book is quite amazing. Keep showing us your breads!

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  21. Thank you! Thor is very happy with it!

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  22. Claire says:

    What a great looking sweater! Love the raglan, the pockets and the color!

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  23. Hamelman’s book (2d edition) had 60 pages about rye and rye bread recipes … So much to learn and play with! 🙂 >

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  24. Susan says:

    Yes, great sweater and the detail of the twisted cables was very clever. However the breads 🙂
    I like a pâte fermentée and really should pull out my book, Secrets of etc Haven’t looked at it in ages but was looking at a bag of dark rye flour the other day and going hmmm Looks like I now know what i am going to do with it! Never did like the pickles, cocoa, coffee etc stuff. Anothe fascinating book is The Art of Handmade Bread by Dan Lepard. Contemporary European recipes for the home baker. One of the rye loaves has a rye starch like a gelatinized rye mix painted it on it. Recipes from Russia and beyond!

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  25. That is a benefit to repeating the recipe! 🙂 I make mandelbread regularly and am now on automatic when I make it!

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  26. Thank you! Those little details (plus the great yarn) really “makes” the sweater. 🙂

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  27. Thank you! What kind of flatbread?! I haven’t yet met a flatbread I didn’t like. 🙂

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  28. CWLFibers says:

    Love the Sweater! I’ve learn how to make flat bread this year.

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  29. lizomatic says:

    Very nice! You inspire me- I need to get back to experimenting with making different kinds of breads. I’m afraid I’ve gotten in the habit of making the same thing over and over again. Although, I do have the recipe mostly memorized at this point 🙂

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  30. FogKnits says:

    Love the raglan details! Looks great!

    Liked by 1 person

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