About SweatyKnitter

Thanks for visiting my blog!

I come from a long line of fiber artists (generations of Norwegian women – and probably some men). I knit, weave, dye, crochet, sew and, sometimes, pull out my wheel or a drop spindle to spin. I learned to knit around age 5, and while I was growing up my grandmother taught me an array of Norwegian handarbeider (handwork).  I added to my interest in fibers when, as an adult, I learned to spin, weave, dye, and felt.

I live in the U.S. Pacific Northwest.  I have a doctorate in political science and used to be a college professor. I left academia several years ago and, for all intents and purposes, am effectively retired.

I generally post weekly and endeavor to respond to all comments.  I look forward to hearing from and exchanging ideas with other fiber enthusiasts (sweaty or otherwise). ๐Ÿ™‚  If you would like to contact me directly, please feel free to email me at sweatyknitter@gmail.com.

KarenBerthine

P.S.  Oh, by the way, the name “The Sweaty Knitter” does not describe my physical reaction to knitting or any other fiber-related art. Rather, it comes from a typo where someone meant to address me as “The Sweetie Knitterโ€ but misspelled “sweetie.” As at that time I lived where six months of the year the temperature ranges from very warm to unbearably hot, I thought the typo apropos. ๐Ÿ™‚

75 Responses to About SweatyKnitter

  1. Thank you. Always nice to hear from fellow avid knitting scholars. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. ich lese says:

    I just discovered your blog. Love. Love. Love. I cannot wait to delve into it. I too learned to knit/fiberwork from several women of several generations.

    Like

  3. Thank you – so did I. I came home and told Thor about meeting you and the picture you showed me of that beautiful stained glass patterned quilt you made! Just gorgeous!

    Like

  4. Nancy Beechem says:

    I enjoyed meeting you today at Jo Ann Fabrics! I hope to be a frequent visitor to your blog and look forward to running into you again somewhere around town!

    All the best,
    Nancy B.

    Like

  5. Happy you stopped by!
    I giggled the first time I was called that. It still makes me grin – has a bit of whimsy!

    Like

  6. Love the name and the story behind it! I look forward to getting to know you through your blog and learning a thing or two since you have been delving into the fiber arts much longer than I. Happy Day!

    Like

  7. my pleasure; thank you for visiting my blog too!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Hi Karen, thank you for visiting and following my blog. I enjoyed reading some of your posts. Looking forward to read more.

    Like

  9. You’re welcome, and thank you! Ditto! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Hi, thanks for following my blog! I’m looking forward to reading your posts and learning from you! x

    Like

  11. My pleasure, of course! And thank you for reading (and enjoying) my blog!

    Like

  12. Of course – and thanks for popping by!

    Like

  13. And me to yours! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  14. iriegemini says:

    Thank you for your follow, and I’m glad you liked my posts on TKK. Now I am enjoying my visit to yours! Looking forward to your future posts!

    Like

  15. cheliamoose says:

    Thanks for liking my post on Google-fu skills, Karen. It helped lead me back to your own excellent blog!

    Like

  16. Anita says:

    Karen, thank you very much for the follow. I loved reading your posts (so funny and informative!) and am looking forward to more.

    Like

  17. Iโ€™ve nominated you for the One Lovely Blog Award because I love reading you blog, especially the historical and technical information you take the time to research ๐Ÿ™‚
    You can find more information here: https://creepingthyme.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/one-lovely-blog/

    Like

  18. bonnyknits says:

    Hello! I’ve nominated you for the One Lovely Blog Award because I so enjoy reading your posts! ๐Ÿ™‚ If you’ve got the time and inclination, you can check out the details here: http://bonnyknits.com/2014/11/23/one-lovely-blog-award/

    Like

  19. I just wanted to tell you that I have nominated you for the Liebster Award. Please feel free to accept or ignore it. In any case, it is really a pleasure to read your blog and I wanted to share this with others.
    Here is my post about it, if you accept it, you will have to reply to the questions at the end of the post: http://atelieroursonne.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/liebster-award-thank-you/

    Like

  20. Selena Rea says:

    Thank you, great advise!

    Like

  21. Hmmm, my thoughts: (1) See what you like about other bloggers’ website that you can use/imitate in yours, and (2) respond to other bloggers’ comments on your site. ๐Ÿ™‚ Good luck – and have fun!

    Like

  22. Selena Rea says:

    Thank you for following my blog! I’m a baby blogger, so any advise or hints would be appreciated if you feel up to it. Your articles are interesting and funny. Good job!

    Like

  23. Pearl says:

    A friend sent me this link…
    http://jezebel.com/norwegian-tv-station-to-air-five-straight-hours-of-comp-1442513293
    …and I thought of you immediately! Five hours of competitive knitting on Norwegian television! What a great country ๐Ÿ˜€

    Like

  24. I am finishing the Basics Course at the moment, and it has been very enjoyable. I am not an experienced knitter and the course has brought me a certain comfort level about beginning the Masters Course. I plan to begin that course in the next month. I don’t believe the courses are for every learning style, or even necessary for many. TKGA states and believes that achieving their Masters Certification adds value to a knitter such as a pattern designer, knitting instructor, author, or person in some way associated with the profession. That I can not judge. However, it is meeting my needs and bringing me pleasure, and that is just fine. Add to that, I would never have found your very interesting site without them!

    Like

  25. Thank you and you’re welcome. From time to time I think about enrolling in the KGA’s master courses. How are you enjoying them?

    Like

  26. Thank you for all the information about pattern formatting. I am enrolled in The Knitting Guild Association’s Masters Courses and currently researching this subject. I also created a check list for myself from your comments on essential items to include in patterns and errors to avoid. I find your Neo-Norsk approach to formatting the most sensible of all I have reviewed. Again, thank you for all the knowledge and the time you have given to the knitting community.

    Like

  27. sindhoooo says:

    Thanks for following my blog ๐Ÿ™‚
    Best wishes for being the award nominee! I love being connected to your blog. I hope you win!

    Like

  28. monsteryarns says:

    Afternoon!
    I’ve nominated you for the WordPress Family Award. My blog entry is scheduled for tomorrow morning. Have a good week and Thank you!

    Like

  29. Thanks for visiting my blog. I hear Yorkshire is quite beautiful. I’ve never been to England. My mother, however, learned British English and for a long time had difficulty understanding Americans, especially the southern dialects. I met her English teacher once – a Norwegian who spoke beautiful “king’s” or “queen’s” English!

    Like

  30. knittedfog says:

    Greetings from Yorkshire! Thanks for reading and liking the feminist coffee post, it was a reblog to begin with, I’ll pass the info along.
    I’ve just visited Stavanger to stay with friends for a few days, It’s too beautiful for words!
    Amanda

    Like

  31. Thank you for stopping by and reading my blog! Yes, I think many people think about picking up knitting again when they learn they will be grandparents. My grandson loves wearing handmade sweaters and hats I make for him. Curiously my granddaughter doesn’t seem to care – probably because I am not knitting her princess ensembles. . I am hoping she will grow out if that soon! Congratulations on the arrival of a new family member to love and adore!

    Like

  32. I have just started knitting again, prompted by my first grandchildren due this year. I’m loving it. Love your blog. I find all of the different yarns fascinating and your blog is widening my knowledge of different yarns I might experiment with. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  33. myidlethumbs says:

    I was so new I didn’t even know where to look when I got a notification! Thanks for your comment, that was really thoughtful. You are right… I love seeing that someone has had a little sneak peek! I haven’t been a very good blogger though! Hopefully I’ll get better as time goes on! Thanks for your patience too!x

    Like

  34. kyred says:

    You’re welcome.

    Like

  35. kyred says:

    Hi, Iโ€™ve nominated you for the Reader Appreciation Award.
    http://kyred.wordpress.com/2012/09/29/319/

    Like

  36. Even when the newbie status wears off, ๐Ÿ™‚ receiving comments from other bloggers is always great!

    Like

  37. Starfruit says:

    Hi Sweetie! ๐Ÿ˜‰ I’m honored you stitched by my blog and thanks for hooking me into yours! I’m a newbie at blogging so, true enough, each ‘like’ or comment really does give me a high ๐Ÿ˜€

    Like

  38. Thank you … I know I was very excited when I got the first comment on my blog. So when I come across new blogs I like, I make sure to let the new blogger know someone enjoyed her/his post! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  39. Hope says:

    Thank you so much for stopping by my (very new!) blog!! ๐Ÿ™‚ I’ve really enjoyed reading over some of your posts just now – and I love the story of how you got your blog’s name! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

  40. I envy artists who paint … I admire and am awed by their talent!

    Like

  41. I love your blog’s name and when I took a peek at it I realized you were just at the beginning stages. I remember who pleased I was to get my first “like” and/or a comment so decided it might you feel encouraged too! I look forward to watching your blog unfold. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  42. myidlethumbs says:

    Thanks for following my blog http://myidlethumbs.wordpress.com/ – even though I only started yesterday with my one little post – you show great faith! I have just spent a lovely hour getting to know you through your blog, thank you. Wish me luck with keeping it up now I have started!

    Like

  43. What’s not to like?! Thanks for popping in to visit!

    Like

  44. Thanks for liking my post! Interesting blog, I like the bit about hats, I’m partial to them myself…

    Like

  45. Thanks for dropping by and following my blog. I really appreciate it! I love what you’ve done on yours!

    Like

  46. Maryanne says:

    I LOVE YOUR BLOG. I am trying to convey just how much by my stand-alone opening statement!!! Really lovely and I look forward to reading more. Thanks for liking our post!

    Like

  47. Thank you; I am flattered and honored!

    Like

  48. marissafh says:

    I’ve nominated you for the ‘One Lovely Blog’ award. Details are on my post (http://marissafh.com/2012/06/17/one-lovely-blog-award/). Pass it on if you feel you can; if not, enjoy the well-deserved award for a lovely blog!

    Like

  49. Thank you! I’ll check out your post!

    Like

  50. Vix says:

    Hey,
    I’ve nominated you for the Sunshine Blogger Award! Check out my post at http://vixknits.wordpress.com/2012/06/15/the-sunshine-keeps-on-coming/
    Vix

    Like

  51. Sadly I didn’t yarn bomb anything … but I loved the pic on your site of the yarn bombed bus. Yup, those are the kinds of bombs warring nations and groups should use to make their political statements!

    What a great gift from your grandmother! I hope you have fun recreating them. I have my grandmother’s handwritten cookbook from 1925 … a treasure … I don’t have a memory of her in the kitchen without that book in hand! And the cover is handwoven!

    Like

  52. Hi Karen,

    Thank you for visiting my blog. Hope you draped a few trees/bicycles with yarn on the International yarn bombing day! What a Lovely blog you have here and your addiction to knitting page has just made me realise what a slippery slope I may be on…nevertheless bring it on!

    I am just re-starting this lovely hobby I picked up in school, my grandmum used to crochet traditional islamic hats for all the boys in the house/neighbourhood and she has some lovely fair-isle type pattern hand drawn in a a notebook that I have now inherited. She used real gold and silver threads in her time!! I will suffice with lovely hand spun and dyed local wool. Big fan of the lovely coarse Shetland yarn.

    All the best on your blog and I hope we will continue these exchanges for times to come.

    Like

  53. Wow, a “tomboy” … did you grow up in Australia?

    And oh yes – the regional variations of youth! When I was teaching in Pennsylvania (east coast of US), my students used to talk about eating a “trashplate.” Confused, I asked what that was (as it sounded revolting), and they, surprised that I had never eaten or even heard of a trashplate, replied, “Well perhaps you know it by the name people in update New York call it: Garbage plate.” After they described its ingredients, I realized it could only be eaten (and briefly at that), by the young! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  54. Hello, Karen, thank you for visiting my blog. I just chuckled over your post about jumpers and sweaters and vests and what I call this and somebody else calls that when we all mean the same thing. I have a teenage son and I love making things for him, but kids’ terminology is another minefield again. I’m presently sewing him what I would call a sweatshirt but he calls a sweater and when he was travelling last year I bought him a jumper that he assured me was a cardigan! (No, it wasn’t, it couldn’t possibly have been a cardigan, as it was a one-piece article with nary a button or closure in sight.) I was also intrigued to see that you refer to as knitting what I grew up knowing as tomboy (the icord made using nails banged into a wooden cotton reel).

    Like

  55. Thank you for reading my blog. One of my (non-fiber artist) friends tells me that when I say I into fiber, it sounds like I’m a cereal and grain merchant! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  56. t4mworkshops says:

    Found your blog very interesting Karen, I am also into all things fibre-related and look forward to seeing more of your projects.

    Like

  57. fibercrush says:

    No, I’ve never come across that one.

    Like

  58. I look forward to seeing them when you post them! Have you ever looked at the blog site that posts amazing B&W pics of models etc. in amazing couture gowns?

    Like

  59. fibercrush says:

    Thanks Karen for all the “likes” on my blog. I’m enjoying seeing your “vintage” knits. I have just a handful of things made by my mother and my grandmother that I’ll save to post on days when I don’t have much of my own stuff to blog.

    Like

  60. Thank you. I am glad you enjoy reading my blog.

    Like

  61. 312east5th says:

    i love your blog. your stories are so candid and the topics are so interesting. i never click follow but i just could not resist!

    Like

  62. Thank you … and thank you for visiting my blog. The best thing about the Ishi bag is that my daughter LOVES it. Every time I’ve seen her since I gave it to her, she’s got that bag with her!

    Like

  63. I love your Ishi Bag – it’s so beautiful. Great photos too. x

    Like

  64. Thank you for isiting my blog. You have some very provocative designs!

    Like

  65. Hi Karen,
    I am always intrigued when I come across people who ‘have had a brush with the NORTH’ – Scandinavia! Glad to ‘meet’ you and looking forward to exchanging notes! Swantje

    Like

  66. Wow, your needles must be busy! Because they are so close together, though, there will be little opportunity for handing down grandmother’s handknits! Oh well, maybe you’ll get another group of grandchildren in two years! Seriously, congratulations to you and your family!

    Like

  67. sandra dorey says:

    Hi Karen, Thank you so much for paying Stonechat a visit and ‘liking’ my ‘Riverbank’ page on my blog. It’s been great to visit your blog and also connect with so many other fibre artists through it. I am busily knitting for the 4, yes i did say 4! new grandchildren who are due to arrive within the next 6 months. One in 3 weeks time, one in July and then the grand finale of twins in November -YIKES!

    Like

  68. Thank you! I really enjoy reading other’s blogs and learning some very creative uses of old methods!

    Like

  69. Thanks for following my blog— I look forward to hearing from you, and in the meantime, I’m having a great time reading your posts!

    Like

  70. ordinarygood says:

    Hi Karen,

    Thank you for following my blog at http://koruknits.wordpress.com.

    I have another blog and I have yet to work out how to comment using my knitting blog.

    I’ll follow your blog with interest.
    Thanks and take care
    Lynley in New Zealand

    Like

  71. Thank you for reading my blog. I hope you had a great time in Denmark and learned a lot in the class with Cheryl!

    I start wool sweaters in the summer because there are a bunch of birthday deadlines etc. in the fall and winter in my family!

    Like

  72. Chela Noto says:

    Karen,

    Naturally the title drew me in, and indeed I do sometimes get sweaty when I have a large project draped over my knees in mid summer… And since it seems we are both in the Bay Area that means those two days in late August when it feels like the world is about do end!

    I have just “re” started my old blog after having taken an amazing workshop with Cherul Oberle in Denver. I look forward to reading about your adventures in fiber!

    Cheers – Chela Noto
    http://www.throwsticks.blogspot.com if you are interested.

    Like

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